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Forum » Riddick University » Relations & Seduction Art » Romance - Love
Romance - Love
nykoDate: Tuesday, 2014-04-15, 22:47:03 | Message # 1
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Romance (love)
From [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)]Wikipedia[/url], the free encyclopedia

Romance is the expressive and pleasurable feeling from an emotional attraction towards another person associated with love.

In the context of romantic love relationships, romance usually implies an expression of one's strong romantic love, or one's deep and strong emotional desires to connect with another person intimately or romantically.

Historically, the term "romance" originates with the medieval ideal of chivalry as set out in its Romance literature.

General definitions

  • The debate over an exact definition of romantic love may be found in literature as well as in the works of psychologists, philosophers, biochemists and other professionals and specialists. Romantic love is a relative term, but generally accepted as a definition that distinguishes moments and situations within intimate relationships to an individual as contributing to a significant relationship connection.
  • The addition of drama to relationships of close, deep and strong love.
    In romantic relationships[[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Romance_(love)&action=edit§ion=2]edit[/url]]During the initial stages of a romantic relationship, there is more often more emphasis on emotions—especially those of love,intimacycompassionappreciation, and [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Affinity_(sociology)]affinity[/url]—rather than physical intimacy. Romantic love in the early stages is often characterized by uncertainty,[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-tws3FebL494-1][1][/url] along with emotional anxiety that love may not be returned:
    Love is this way: You're on one side of the edge of a canyon -- windy, deep, sunny, steep. Your lover's on the other. You wave to each other across the divide. You have a parachute. Your lover has a parachute. But the cords to open the parachutes are on the BACK not the front so only your lover can open your parachute for you, and you for your lover. You pause. Are you ready to jump? Will your lover jump too? If you and your lover jump simultaneously, grasp mid-air and yank each other's cords, you'll glide sweetly to your getaway island where a candlelight dinner awaits. If one thing goes wrong, a glitch in timing, a puff of wind, the slightest hesitation -- you'll be crushed on the rocks below.—Anonymous[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-tws3L133-2][2][/url]Within an established relationship, romantic love can be defined as a freeing or optimizing of intimacy in a particularly luxurious manner (or the opposite as in the "natural"), or perhaps in greater spirituality, irony, or peril to the romantic relationship.
    In culture, arranged marriages and betrothals are customs that may conflict with romance due to the nature of the arrangement. It is possible, however, that strong and close romance and love can exist between the partners in an arranged marriage.
    Historical definition[[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Romance_(love)&action=edit§ion=3]edit[/url]]Historians believe that the actual English word "romance" developed from a vernacular dialect within the French language meaning "verse narrative"—referring to the style of speech, writing, and artistic talents within elite classes. The word was originally an adverb of the Latin origin "Romanicus," meaning "of the Roman style." The connecting notion is that European medieval vernacular tales were usually about chivalric adventure, not combining the idea of love until late into the seventeenth century.[citation needed]
    The word "romance" has also developed with other meanings in other languages such as the early nineteenth century Spanish and Italian definitions of "adventurous" and "passionate", sometimes combining the idea of "love affair" or "idealistic quality."
    In primitive societies, tension existed between marriage and the erotic, but this was mostly expressed in taboo regarding the menstrual cycle and birth.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-3][3][/url]

    Bernger von Horheim in theCodex Manesse (early 14th century)

    Anthropologists such as Claude Lévi-Strauss show that there were complex forms of courtship in ancient as well as contemporary primitive societies. There may not be evidence, however, that members of such societies formed loving relationships distinct from their established customs in a way that would parallel modern romance.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-4][4][/url]
    Before the 18th century, as now, there were many marriages that were not arranged – having risen out of more or less spontaneous relationships. After the 18th century, illicit relationships took on a more independent role. In bourgeois marriage, illicitness may have become more formidable and likely to cause tension.[citation needed] In Ladies of the Leisure ClassRutgers University professor Bonnie G. Smith depicts courtship and marriage rituals that may be viewed as oppressive to modern people. She writes "When the young women of the Nord married, they did so without illusions of love and romance. They acted within a framework of concern for the reproduction of bloodlines according to financial, professional, and sometimes political interests." Subsequent sexual revolution has lessened the conflicts arising out of liberalism, but not eliminated them.
    Anthony Giddens, in his book The Transformation of Intimacy: Sexuality, Love and Eroticism in Modern Society, states that romantic love introduced the idea of a narrative into an individual's life. He adds that telling a story was one of the meanings of romance. According to Giddens, the rise of romantic love more or less coincided with the emergence of the novel. It was then that romantic love, associated with freedom and therefore the ideals of romantic love, created the ties between freedom and self-realization.
    David R. Shumway, in his book Romance, Intimacy, and The Marriage Crisis, states that the discourse of intimacy emerged in the last third of the 20th century and that this discourse claimed to be able to explain how marriage and other relationships worked. For the discourse of intimacy emotional closeness was much more important than [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Passion_(emotion)]passion[/url]. This does not mean by any means that intimacy is to replace romance. On the contrary, intimacy and romance coexist.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-5][5][/url]
    The 21st century has seen the growth of globalization and people now live in a world of transformations that affect almost every aspect of our lives, and love has not been the exception. One example of the changes experienced in relationships was explored by Giddens regarding homosexual relationships. According to Giddens since homosexuals were not able to marry they were forced to pioneer more open and negotiated relationships. This kind of relationships then permeated the heterosexual population.
    Shumway also states that together with the growth of capitalism the older social relations dissolved, including marriage. Marriage meaning for women changed as they had more socially acceptable alternatives and were less willing to accept unhappy relations and, therefore, divorce rates severely increased.
    The discourse of romance continues to exist today together with intimacy. Shumway states that on the one hand, romance is the part that offers adventure and intense emotions while offering the possibility to find the perfect mate. On the other hand, intimacy offers deep communication, friendship, and long lasting sharing.

    "La Belle Dame sans Merci" 1893, by John William Waterhouse (1849-1917)

    Popularization of love[[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Romance_(love)&action=edit§ion=4]edit[/url]]The conception of romantic love was popularized in Western culture by the concept of courtly loveChevaliers, or knights in the Middle Ages, engaged in what were usually non-physical and non-marital relationships with women of nobility of whom they served. These relations were highly elaborate and ritualized in a complexity that was steeped in a framework of tradition, which stemmed from theories of etiquette derived out of chivalry as a moral code of conduct.
    Courtly love and the notion of domnei were often the subjects of troubadours, and could be typically found in artistic endeavors such as lyrical narratives and poetic prose of the time. Since marriage was commonly nothing more than a formal arrangement,[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-6][6][/url] courtly love sometimes permitted expressions of emotional closeness which may have been lacking from the union between husband and wife.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-7][7][/url] In terms of courtly love, "lovers" did not necessarily refer to those engaging in sexual acts, but rather, to the act of caring and to emotional intimacy.
    The bond between a knight and his Lady, or the woman of typically high stature of whom he served, may have escalated psychologically but seldom ever physically.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-employees.oneonta.edu-8][8][/url]For knighthood during the Middle Ages, the intrinsic importance of a code of conduct was in large part as a value system of rules codified as a guide to aid a knight in his capacity as champion of the downtrodden, but especially in his service to the Lord.
    In the context of dutiful service to a woman of high social standing, ethics designated as a code were effectively established as an institution to provide a firm moral foundation by which to combat the idea that unfit attentions and affections were to ever be tolerated as "a secret game of trysts" behind closed doors. Therefore, a knight trained in the substance of "chivalry" was instructed, with especial emphasis, to serve a lady most honorably, with purity of heart and mind. To that end, he committed himself to the welfare of both Lord and Lady with unwavering discipline and devotion, while at the same time, presuming to uphold core principles set forth in the code by the religion by which he followed.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-employees.oneonta.edu-8][8][/url]
    Religious meditations upon the Virgin Mary were partially responsible for the development of chivalry as an ethic and lifestyle: the concept of the honor of a lady and knightly devotion to her, coupled with an obligatory respect for all women, factored prominently as central to the very identity of medieval knighthood. As knights were increasingly emulated, eventual changes were reflected in the inner-workings of feudal society. Members of the aristocracy were schooled in the principles of chivalry, which facilitated important changes in attitudes regarding the value of women.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-9][9][/url]
    Behaviorally, the manner in which a knight was to regard himself towards a lady, was with a transcendence of premeditated thought; his virtue ingrained within his character. A chevalier was to conduct himself always graciously, bestowing upon her the utmost courtesy and attentiveness. He was to echo shades of this to all women, regardless of class, age, or status.[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-sweeney-10][10][/url] Over time, the concept of chivalry and the notion of the courtly gentleman became synonymous with the ideal of how love and romance should exist between the sexes. Through the timeless popularization in art and literature of tales of knights and princesses, kings and queens, a formative and long standing (sub)consciousness helped to shape relationships between men and women.
    [url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/De_amore_(Andreas_Capellanus)]De amore[/url] or The Art of Courtly Love, as it is known in English, was written in the 12th century. The text is widely misread as permissive of extramarital affairs. However, it is useful to differentiate the physical from without: romantic love as separate and apart from courtly love when interpreting such topics as: "Marriage is no real excuse for not loving", "He who is not jealous cannot love", "No one can be bound by a double love", and "When made public love rarely endures".[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-11][11][/url]
    Some believe that romantic love evolved independently in multiple cultures. For example, in an article presented by Henry Grunebaum, he argues "therapists mistakenly believe that romantic love is a phenomenon unique to Western cultures and first expressed by the troubadours of the Middle Ages."[url=http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Romance_(love)#cite_note-12][12][/url]
    The more current and Western traditional terminology meaning "court as lover" or the general idea of "romantic love" is believed to have originated in the late nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, primarily from that of the French culture. This idea is what has spurred the connection between the words "romantic" and "lover," thus coining English phrases for romantic love such as "loving like the Romans do." The precise origins of such a connection are unknown, however. Although the word "romance" or the equivalents thereof may not have the same connotation in other cultures, the general idea of "romantic love" appears to have crossed cultures and been accepted as a concept at one point in time or another.



    Message edited by nyko - Tuesday, 2014-04-15, 22:49:24
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    lussyDate: Saturday, 2014-05-24, 16:08:25 | Message # 2
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    passion

                                  




    Juicy Pussy
     
    yasashDate: Wednesday, 2014-05-28, 22:29:47 | Message # 3
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    “Iubirea nu inseamna doar trup, din moment ce are in vedere sentimentul, si nu este doar spirit, din moment ce se consuma intre doua trupuri” - Maurice Merleau-Ponty (Elogiul filozofiei si alte eseuri)

     
    nutzyDate: Saturday, 2014-06-14, 23:51:00 | Message # 4
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    It’s a fact, I mused to myself, that in societies like ours sex truly represents a second system of differentiation, completely independent of money; and as a system of differentiation it functions just as mercilessly. The effects of these two systems are, furthermore, strictly equivalent. Just like unrestrained economic liberalism, and for similar reasons, sexual liberalism produces phenomena of absolute pauperization. Some men make love every day; others five or six times in their life, or never. Some make love with dozens of women, others with none. It’s what’s known as ” the law of the market”. In an economic system where unfair dismissal is prohibited, every person more or less manages to find their place. In a sexual system where adultery is prohibited, every person more or less manages to find their bed mate. In a totally liberal economic system certain people accumulate considerable fortunes; others stagnate in unemployment and misery. In a totally liberal sexual system certain people have a varied and exciting erotic life; others are reduced to masturbation and solitude…………

    Love as a kind of innocence and as a capacity for illusion, as an aptitude for epitomizing the whole of the other sex in a single loved being rarely resists a year of sexual immorality, and never two. In reality the successive sexual experiences accumulated during adolescence undermine and rapidly destroy all possibility of projection of an emotional and romantic sort; progressively, and in fact extremely quickly, one becomes as capable of love as an old slag.

    -Michel Houellebecq


    "Unirea dintre barbat si femeie este precum comuniunea dintre Cer si Pamant, iar Cerul si Pamantul dureaza vesnic tocmai datorita acestei comuniuni perfecte. Oamenii au uitat acest secret, devenind muritori. Dar cei ce-l cunosc au deschisa in fata lor adevarata cale spre Nemurire" - Shang-Ku-San-Tai

     
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